Hedgehogs as Pets

You have a what?! The latest trend in pets is…pet hedgehogs?

I was scrolling through my Facebook profile the other day, when I noticed a status about a new pet. I naturally assumed that it would be a puppy or kitten. So, I was incredibly surprised when I saw the picture of the new hedgehog. What makes these critters good pets? Are they high maintenance or low maintenance? For all the other curious parties out there, here is a brief look at what adopting a hedgehog would entail.

Hedgehogs are small mammals that are most commonly known for their quills. The most common type of hedgehog to be adopted as a pet is the African pygmy. This breed grows to be around six to nine inches long. These types of pets normally live four to six years, but some can reach ten years. These animals are nocturnal—or most active at night—and are solitary. This means that your hedgehog should live alone in its habitat. While they are small animals, they do need a larger cage to run around and play in. They become active around dusk.

Hedgehogs are insectivores, which means that they eat insects. They also eat plants. To find the best foods for your hedgehog, visit your local pet store.

Are hedgehogs for you? They do make for a great low maintenance pet. However, you may want to keep your hedgehog away from children. A child can get too excited and scare your pet, which could cause it to extend its quills.

Talk to your veterinarian or the experts at the local pet store to find out if a hedgehog is your next new, and interesting pet!

Do you know anyone with a pet hedgehog? Tell us about it in the comment section!

One comment on “Hedgehogs as Pets

  1. I own a hedgehog, Miss Penelope is so fun. They are quite a bit of maintenance — I would say, they aren't the best pets for kids. As their quills tend to scare most kids, they also make a huffing noise when scared — this can intimidate kids and most adults — which can lead to dropping him/her. They are so fun if you have the time, patience and late night play time to spare!
    I would love to help any one looking at adopting a hedgie — and would be happy to share my insights on our hedehog life.

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