Ask Seth!

I have a boxer puppy and during her exam the vet found a small hernia by her belly button. My vet wants to fix this when we have her spayed at 6 months of age, but I would prefer to take care of this sooner.  Is it normal to wait three months to fix a hernia?  I would like to know what  you would do.

Lisette,  from Pennsylvania

Lisette,

It sounds like your veterinarian diagnosed an umbilical hernia which is usually located at the navel or belly button. A hernia is a protrusion of a body part through an abnormal opening in the body wall. Small hernias may not be dangerous, but large ones can be very serious, sometimes causing severe problems and in some cases even death.  Large hernias can entrap organs which can lead to decreased blood flow to that organ. Because this hernia was just noticed and she is already scheduled to have surgery to be spayed in the coming months, I personally agree with your vet.  Keep a close eye on the hernia; be attentive to the size of the hernia and your dog’s general behavior and food consumption. If any concerns arise, or your puppy starts to display some unusual behavior or symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately. It makes sense to only do one surgery since your vet will be in the abdomen to complete the spay. Repairing umbilical hernias are a common procedure for a veterinarian.

What would you do? Would you take the chance and wait a couple of months or is it too risky? Share your personal opinion on whether or not it's safe to delay the surgery until the puppy is spayed.

Seth Mayersohn

About Seth Mayersohn

Have a question about your pet’s health or behavior? Readers can submit questions to askseth@petassure.com. Seth Mayersohn has a B.S. in Animal and Veterinary Sciences and a M.S. in Agriculture from West Virginia University. He has 12 years of experience as a veterinary technician and draws upon that experience to help our readers!

4 comments on “Ask Seth!

  1. I personally would be more concerned about putting the pup under anesthesia within three months of each surgery than I would about the hernia.

  2. I would wait and pay close attention. Double surgery is risky and since it isn't life threatening, then wait. What you didn't tell us is how old your puppy is. So the waiting probably won't be as long as it feels like to you.

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